Religion in Ancient Rome

     Ancient Rome was a time of growth and the true beginning to the idea of a big city. They went through a large amount of change and updates to there every day lives. A steady trusted Government was in place and the people seemed to be happy. Their religion could be describes by the phrase do ut des, which means I give that you might give. They viewed their religious lives through rituals, prayer, and sacrifice. It was not a faith type that we see today. They had a large interest of deities that could be worshiped or given a sacrifice.

     The deities were a major part of Religion in ancient Rome, and you can find them in almost every archeological discovery dealing with that time period. They would assign a deity for everything. Neighborhoods often had special deity that could be prayed too for protection and good fortune. Within those neighborhoods were separate deities for each household. These were for the families and were prayed to often. A good amount of deities are unknown or come from outside sources.

     Large criticism is placed on the Romans for their accepting of separate deities that come from other parts of the world. It seems as though they would allow the integration of other religious practices and deities from all over the world. This became worse as Rome grew and spread across the area. They looked at this as keeping the lands tradition preserved and keeping peace. Religion in ancient Rome was vastly different than the religions of today, although we have grown off of there mold.

 

Bassette, Dr., ed. “ion in Ancient Rome.” RichEast. Rich East High School, n.d.
     Web. 20 Oct. 2013. <http://www.richeast.org/htwm/Greeks/Romans/Bass/
     index.html>.

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